Using Hypnosis to Break the Cycle of Negative Thinking

September 4th, 2013 § Comments Off on Using Hypnosis to Break the Cycle of Negative Thinking § permalink

You know what it’s like to get a song stuck in your head. It’s annoying, but eventually it fades away and you forget that it was there in the first place. If only it were that easy to get rid of repetitive negative thinking! While it might not be as easy as letting that song fade away, it is possible to put an end to the cycle of repetitive negative thinking, and hypnosis can help.

It has been estimated that we have anywhere from 25,000 to 50,000 thoughts a day, and many of them are repetitive. When I work with clients in regard to breaking the cycle of negative thinking, I often start by having them think about their brain in the following way:

Your Brain is Just another Organ

Think of your brain as just another organ in your body, like your heart, your liver, your lungs, and so on. Each of these organs has a very specific job to do. Your heart is responsible for the circulation of blood, your liver’s job is to filter this blood, your lungs do all the breathing, and the job of your brain is to think thoughts. That’s just what it does, it thinks thoughts. Here’s the important part, and a big “ah-ha” for a lot of people   You are not your thoughts! It’s true. You are not your thoughts; you are the witness, the observer, of your thoughts. You are the awareness behind the thoughts, just like you are aware of your heart pumping and your lungs breathing.

This change in perspective is the first step in the understanding that you have the ability to control your thoughts. Our emotions are the result of the thoughts we are thinking, so it makes sense that as you learn to control your thoughts, you also learn to control your feelings.   » Read the rest of this entry «

Why Neuroplasticity is a Big Deal

August 16th, 2013 § Comments Off on Why Neuroplasticity is a Big Deal § permalink

Why Neuroplasticity is a Big Deal – The term “neuroplasticity” is being heard often these days. Why? What is the big deal about it? Why should we care? This guest post by Robert Lilly addresses those questions.

The term “neuroplasticity” is being heard more and more these days. Why? What is the big deal about it? To understand that, let’s begin by first defining what neuroplasticity is. According to MedicineNet.com, neuroplasticity is “the brain’s ability to reorganize itself by forming new neural connections throughout life. Neuroplasticity allows the neurons (nerve cells) in the brain to compensate for injury and disease and to adjust their activities in response to new situations or to changes in their environment.” According to Wikipedia the term refers to “changes in neural pathways and synapses which are due to changes in behavior, environment and neural processes, as well as changes resulting from bodily injury. Neuroplasticity has replaced the formerly-held position that the brain is a physiologically static organ, and explores how – and in which ways – the brain changes throughout life.” In addition, from the National Library of Medicine – Medical Subject Headings: “The capacity of the NERVOUS SYSTEM to change its reactivity as the result of successive activations.” In other words, it refers to the brain’s ability to grow and change as a result of stimuli throughout a person’s entire lifespan. » Read the rest of this entry «

Using Hypnosis to Ease the Discomfort of Change

January 1st, 2013 § Comments Off on Using Hypnosis to Ease the Discomfort of Change § permalink

Creating long lasting change in our lives is possible as long as we are consciously willing to change and are not living in a state of wishful thinking. Hypnosis is a valuable tool used to accelerate change and lessen the discomfort often associated with it. This article addresses the value of examining our belief systems in regard to the associated discomfort, or pain, of creating change in our lives.

January 1st: the beginning of the new year, an arbitrary date in the grand scheme of things. It is, however, the most popular time of year to eliminate unwanted habits, most notably to lose weight or quit smoking. Creating change in our lives is often easier when we set a start date, and what better time to begin this transformation than on the first day of the new year?

The degree of success with New Year’s resolutions varies widely. Why is it that some people find it easier to keep their resolutions than others do? For some, behavior change is as simple as owning up to the bad habit, agreeing to make different choices, and then doing it. Although not rare, this is the exception. » Read the rest of this entry «

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